Our Measurable Method

We’re committed to helping you feel better in your body with an approach rooted in science.

Most exercise apps today are unsupported by research. With the lack of evidence-based training available, it’s easy to understand why so many people struggle to achieve the results they’re after.

We believe in measuring how you move, in order to:

  • Help you understand where you’re starting from,
  • Enable you to focus on areas that make the biggest impact, and
  • Make it easy to track your progress over time.
We know a lot about healthy, balanced movement training, but we believe there’s always room to grow.  

Together with lululemon’s Whitespace Explorations team, we are collaborating with the University of British Columbia to research the beneficial effects of using movr.

Supporting Research

Balanced mobility and strength training can have a wide range of positive impacts.

Proactive, functional training has been shown to decrease injury, improve performance efficiency and enhance overall wellness [1]

Proactive, functional training has been shown to decrease injury, improve performance efficiency and enhance overall wellness [1]

Evidence shows that strength training is associated with

reduced:

  • anxiety symptoms among healthy adults

  • symptoms of depression

  • pain intensity among patients with low back pain*

  • fatigue symptoms

improved:

  • cognition

  • sleep quality

  • self esteem [2] [3]

*movr is not intended to manage, treat or cure any medical condition. If you’re experiencing physical pain, consult a physician before using movr.

movr is free.

Start moving and feeling
better today.

movr is free.

Download movr to start moving
better today.

References

1. Burton, L., Cook, G., Hoogenboom, B., (2006). Pre-Participation Screening: The use of fundamental movements as an assessment of function – part 2.

2. O’Connor, P. J., Herring, M. P., & Caravalho, A. (2010). Mental Health Benefits of Strength Training in Adults. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine, 4(5), 377–396.

3. Buman, M. P., & King, A. C. (2010). Exercise as a Treatment to Enhance Sleep. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine, 4(6), 500–514.